British Meat Processors Association
British Meat Processors Association

BMPA Appoints Peter Hardwick as Trade Policy Advisor

Peter Hardwick - BMPA Trade Policy Advisor

The British Meat Processors Association (BMPA) has appointed Peter Hardwick as its Trade Policy Advisor as part of an on-going restructure of the organisation.

Peter has worked in the international meat sector for 40 years in meat production and processing and international trading including exports and policy. During that time he has built up a large network of connections across multiple overseas markets and has established himself as one of the UK’s leading experts in both domestic and international trade. He is a dedicated internationalist and speaks five languages.

Commenting on his new role, Mr Hardwick said: “I am excited to join BMPA at a time of such change both for the industry and for the Association and I look forward to helping our members handle whatever challenges Brexit poses.”

Nick Allen, CEO of BMPA said: “Peter joins BMPA at a time of unprecedented upheaval in the British meat industry. His experience in international trade along with his lucid and diplomatic approach will be vital in helping our members to navigate the choppy waters of Brexit and make sense of the new trading conditions once we leave the EU.”

President of the BMPA, Isla Roebuck added that: “Peter’s experience and deep knowledge of the meat industry will be a valuable resource for BMPA. We are building a team that will be able to better support current members as well as introduce new services, technical information and industry intelligence to create a wider membership offering. I am very pleased to welcome Peter on board so he can play a part in BMPA’s evolution”.

About BMPA

The British Meat Processors Association (BMPA) is the leading trade association for the meat and meat products industry in the UK.

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